Cuban dating woman

Rated 3.94/5 based on 691 customer reviews

Often, civil and church records will include both surnames of the grandparents, giving you the surnames of the great-grandparents as well.

Sometimes both surnames are carried to following generations as a compound surname.

Cuban surnames are patterned after the Spanish form and contain both the father's surname and the mother's surname in that order, sometimes separated by the word "y" ("and").

This is extremely valuable for genealogical research, since by knowing the full surname, you automatically get the surnames of both parents.

This applied to making a change to a different surname not entitled by blood relation, even a simple translation of the surname.

It did not apply to the selection of which surnames to use as discussed above.

Thus we have surnames such as de León ("from Leon"), "del Valle" ("from the valley"), "del Monte" ("from the mountain"), and "Nuñez de Villavicencio" ("Nuñez from the town of Vicencio or Villavicencio").

Over time, the "de" may have been dropped from the surname.

They can legally add their husband's surname(s) after their own, preceded by the word "de" ("of", implying "spouse of"). Sometimes, however, they retain both surnames by adding a dash "-" between the two.

Thus, in the preceding example, Isabel Fernández could sign her name as Isabel Fernández de López, or as Isabel Fernández García de López Famosa. Thus, the individual in question might choose to be known as "Mr. In today's computer culture such long surnames run the risk of being truncated or distorted by data entry clerks almost beyond recognition.

If her husband has died, she can use the words "viuda de" (widow of), abbreviated "vda. Note that it would be totally incorrect to address the last individual in the first example as "Mr. In contemporary Hispanic cultures, particularly in Central and South America, business cards often list only the initial of the maternal surname.

As an example (see the diagram below), José López marries María Famosa. Sometimes, but not always, dashes or the letter "y" are used to group the surnames, so the son could also be known as Pedro López-Fernández, Pedro López-Famosa y Fernández, or as Pedro López-Famosa y Fernández-García.

In some confusing situations you may have to resort to the genealogical records of the parents or other siblings to clarify where one group of surnames ends and the other begins.

Leave a Reply